Digital Diaries

Feb 01

Cyberbullying in the Office: The Politics of Friending Your Workmates

When we hear the term “cyberbullying,” many of us immediately think of mean-spirited kids using social media to intimidate other children.

But bullying survives long into adulthood and has migrated to the workplace, according to the latest installment of AVGs Digital Diaries series: Digital Work Life.

Digital Work Life examines the intersection – or rather collision – of social media and office politics. We found that most offices have a long way to go when it comes to creating awareness and educating their employees or putting guidance or policies in place about what’s acceptable to share on personal and corporate profiles. To set the stage, the study of 4,000 adults from 10 countries across the globe, found that more than half of the respondents believe social media has eroded their privacy in the workplace.

Menacing numbers

Should we be Facebook friends with our colleagues? Should we post photos from drunken work parties? In fact 11 percent of worldwide respondents have experienced embarrassment from photos or videos from a work event that have been uploaded to social media.

And if it’s a work event, who has the authority to decide whether photos can appear on a corporate Facebook page?

What strikes me about our Digital Work Life findings is just how blurred the lines have become for most people and just how conflicting our workplaces can be. For example, 15 percent of US workers have been the victim of a social media insult from a colleague.

Nearly one in 10 of worldwide respondents has had a manager use information gleaned from social media against them or a colleague.

What’s more, nearly a third of worldwide respondents accepted colleagues’ social media requests even though they did not want to.

Boundary time for Employers

When it comes to social media at work, there are a number of different forces at play and employers of all sizes should educate employees about social media etiquette. It is important for employers to create clarity around the responsibilities and accountability of employees in the use of company resources and social media in the work place. A good place to start would be to offer clear codes, guidelines or policies about the use of social media in the office, the sharing of information between colleagues or about the company and clear examples about what is and is not acceptable.

And it’s not enough to just create a policy; employers need to make sure workers are aware of it and how it applies to them.

Employees should Think ahead

Young workers – especially recent graduates – should think carefully about transitioning their student personas, where pretty much anything goes, to professional personas, where one indulgent evening can get them in to trouble and possibly curtail their career.

Regardless of the rules in any one company, employees should create personal guidelines for social media engagement and stick to them over the course of their career and from company to company.

Either you’re friends with your colleagues or not. You can create special circles or walled gardens for colleagues and restrict what you share with them or you can share everything with them.

It’s much easier than people think to simply say that you do not want to become “Facebook” friends with colleagues and, at least in my experience, this reaction garners a great deal of respect. But keep in mind that anything you DO share online about anyone, no matter how seemingly disconnected, can find its way into the wrong hands.

In a sense, the discussion begs a variation to that well known adage: Don’t tell anything to Facebook that you wouldn’t tell every single person you know.

Want to find out more? Visit the AVG blogs here

Jan 31

Do you ever think that Facebook and Twitter have made your business everyone else’s business at work?  The chances are your colleagues feel the same way.
We’ve just released our seventh Digital Diaries study which showed that 53% of the workers we surveyed – and over 6/10 in English speaking countries – think that social media has eroded workplace privacy.

Read more here

Do you ever think that Facebook and Twitter have made your business everyone else’s business at work?  The chances are your colleagues feel the same way.

We’ve just released our seventh Digital Diaries study which showed that 53% of the workers we surveyed – and over 6/10 in English speaking countries – think that social media has eroded workplace privacy.

Read more here

Digital Diaries 7

For Digital Diaries 7 we took a look at the effects the internet has in the workplace. Check out our the results of our study in the report below. 

AVG DD7 Executive Report by avgfree

AVG DIGITAL DIARIES - A Look At How Technology Affects Us From Birth Onwards

Since November 2010, AVG has been running a regular series of ten-country studies called AVG Digital Diaries.   Starting with infants aged 0-2, each stage has looked at how the Internet has affected the development of different age groups.

Check out the report below for a summary of the key results for each phase.

AVG Digital Diaries by avgfree

Oct 23

How prepared are you for your next job interview? CV in order? Suit pressed? Answers rehearsed? What about your online profile, is that in order? You need to be prepared to ensure your prospective employers aren’t in for a nasty surprise when they search your name. We’ve made a video that shows you the worst possible scenario in all of its cringe inducing awfulness. Enjoy!

Are you friends with your boss on Facebook? Are you not worried about the insight they’ll gain into your life? In this age of social media, the professional and the personal come into contact more and more frequently, and you have to make sure you’re ready. We’ve produced a guide to being Facebook friends with your boss - follow it, and your online profile will remain your own business. 

How to be Facebook friends with the boss and keep your job

Our Digital Diaries series has, over the past two years, documented and analysed the effects this digital age has on our development and our relationships with the world. Now, we’d like to introduce Digital Baggage, the sixth instalment in the series. Digital Baggage deals with the 18-25 bracket; more specifically, the care (or lack of care) taken over maintaining a positive online profile. How many of you reading this are unsure as to whether a prospective employer would think twice about taking you on based on what they can find out about you online? We’ve created an infographic to showcase some of the standout statistics. Let us know what you think!

Our Digital Diaries series has, over the past two years, documented and analysed the effects this digital age has on our development and our relationships with the world. Now, we’d like to introduce Digital Baggage, the sixth instalment in the series. Digital Baggage deals with the 18-25 bracket; more specifically, the care (or lack of care) taken over maintaining a positive online profile. How many of you reading this are unsure as to whether a prospective employer would think twice about taking you on based on what they can find out about you online? We’ve created an infographic to showcase some of the standout statistics. Let us know what you think!

Apr 24

AVG Digital Diaries in the media

Since the fifth AVG Digital Diaries study was released, it has had extensive media coverage, being picked up by 60 media outlets and blogs - and counting.    Some highlights are as follows:

To hear interviews with the panellists who were at the AVG Digital Diaries launch event, listen to the BBC Outriders Podcast (nine minutes in) 

Read More

A guide for parents, putting yourself in your kids’ digital shoes

An AVG Digital Diaries guide for parents - putting yourself in your kids’ shoes

When so much of teen life happens online, it is important you have a realistic picture of what life is like in your teen’s digital shoes.

To help parents get a clearer sense of how your teens online behavior might (or might not) match up with your perceptions, Childhood Matters took some of the findings from the latest AVG Digital Diaries study and compared them to recent studies where teens were asked about their digital lives.

Parents, teens and online safety limits - a guide for parents

Parents and online safety limits for teens - a guide

One way to get clear on limits and rules is to install Internet safety software that helps you to keep an eye on the computers, smart phones, tablets, and game consoles in your home.

Internet safety software can help your family to clarify what is in bounds and what is out of bounds when it comes to screen time, places to go on the Internet, and digital social interactions.

Here are some tips on using Internet safety software effectively with your 14-17 year old, produced by Childhood Matters for AVG